Caught in an extraordinary convergence of unhinged stock market volatility and historically low interest rates on savings, many people are rethinking their plans and their vision for the future, especially as they consider the prospect of having to stretch their retirement income over 25 or 30 years.  A study conducted in 2015 by the Employee Benefit Research Institute found workers of all

For as long as there has been stock markets, investors have intuitively known that expectations of returns come with commensurate expectations of risk; the higher return one expects the greater the risk one assumes in order to achieve it.

The figures out last year show that the average amount of student loan debt a student graduates with is a little more than $35,000. Most graduates are carrying multiple student loans from multiple sources, and the cost and complexity of managing them can become overwhelming, especially if they are unable to secure steady employment with sufficient cash flow to make the payments.

Why Bear Markets Don’t Matter

by Natalie Babik on

If you’ve been listening to the financial media of late you have no doubt heard some of the so-called experts prognosticating on the prospect of the next big bear market. Unquestionably, the stock market is at another crossroads, and its 7 percent increase year-to-date belies the concerns that most people have over the global economy.

Anyone with a family to protect understands the critical role life insurance plays in their financial plan However,  in determining the actual amount of coverage to provide essential protection needs, many people tend to adhere to simplistic rules-of-thumb, such as a “multiple of income,” which may leave them wondering if they own too much or too little coverage.

Many people dream of the day they can leave work behind and start pursuing their lifelong dreams. But for most people, you’ll need to achieve financial stability and independence before you can leave behind your day-to-day job in exchange for a more fulfilling path. This is where the increasingly...

Most people are quick to purchase the maximum collision and comprehensive coverage available to protect their new car.  However, the costs associated with fixing or replacing even the most exotic car pale in comparison to the amount of money people will shell out to pay liability claims.

With credit card interest rates ranging between 11% and 22%, it’s no wonder people are looking for alternative ways to manage and pay off their credit card debt. This is where a personal loan might come into play; using a personal loan to pay off your credit card debt can help you manage your overall debt once and for all, if you know how to navigate the pitfalls.

Answer this riddle: what’s the one thing that will eventually happen to everyone, but generally, no one wants to discuss? Death is a subject that immediately conjures up all sorts of emotions because, let’s be honest, the absence of being IS emotional. But, death is also cause for practicality.

Debt After Death – Do You Have it Covered?

by Natalie Babik on

Many people deal with credit card debt all of their lives with most of them giving little or no thought to what happens with their debt after they die. The fact that nearly 60% die without a will is a strong indication that they’ve given absolutely no thought to it.

The stock market is a fast-flying, quick U-turn, up and down game to play. It’s both exhilarating and exhausting. And, if you’re like most people, you’re exceedingly grateful for your financial advisor, broker, and/or portfolio manager. They keep your market investments growing (generally), and give you peace of mind when it comes to overall stock market stability.

The Coronavirus pandemic has affected us all in ways that we didn’t anticipate at the start of the year, especially when it comes to our finances. And unfortunately, just as federal emergency benefits are starting to run out, signs of a second wave of the virus are looming—and some may even say it’s...